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Getting Enough Sleep?

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Getting Enough Sleep?

Steven Nguyen, Contributing Writer

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Sufficient rest is crucial during teen years. Yet, about 87 percent of American high school students are chronically sleep-deprived according to a 2006 survey from National Sleep Foundation. Getting little sleep doesn’t only present chronic tiredness throughout the day, but it can be destructive on the mind and body. High levels of stress and anxiety from school can wreak havoc on anybody’s sleep schedule and be detrimentally linked with health risks of sleep deprivation.

Severe sleep debt has an overwhelming trigger of mental health. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that one in five Americans have some sort of mental illness and the extent of sleep deprivation coexisting with anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and depression that make it more challenging to manage the sleep loss. Senior Yailine Palomino stresses amount about the amount of work she receives. “I got a lot on my plate,” she says, “I don’t even have time to leave the house.” Lack of social connection emphasizes mental illness and sleep deprivation together dangerously correlate toward a downward spiral of dependency on sleeping and anxiety medications and substance abuse. Binge drinking and risky sexual behavior sometimes is sometimes a facade of the effects. But each hour of lost sleep is associated with a 38 percent increased risk of feeling sad or hopeless and a 58 percent increase in suicide attempts. “Sleep deprivation puts teenagers into a kind of perpetual cloud or haze,” explains Dr. Mary Carskadon, a professor of Psychiatry at Brown University, and there is a toll for teenagers to pay.

Sleep is imperative for learning, memory, and other cognitive tasks. Teens evidently lack attention and experience greater emotional distress when they don’t get enough sleep. It requires much more mental stability for teens to think and react. According to a National Sleep Foundation Study, drowsiness or fatigue is the principle cause of at least 100,000 traffic accidents each year and another and Senior Ivy Ly recognizes this. “I woke up in two lanes driving home from school,” and her tug of drowsiness could’ve resulted in a devastating collision to her life.

If teens don’t get enough shut-eye, it’s frankly destructive. Likewise, a lack of sleep can take a harmful swing to teens emotions. A new study shows that sleep deprivation is linked to a disconnect in the part of the brain responsible for keeping emotions under control, adding to the already long list of negative effects of lack of sleep on health. Teens probably aren’t short of conflict in which new evidence suggests people who sleep poorly tend to display more negative emotions and are less successful at conflict resolution. Junior Jaznay Lora finds it frustrating to talk to people when she gets tired. “Every little thing makes me mad,” she says and since it’s normal for teens to disagree on occasion, this finding suggests that a lack of sleep might accentuate disagreements and introduce needless stress into otherwise happy relationships. Sleep may be crucial to good relationships but unhealthy sleeping habits can’t establish the stability.

A whopping 20 percent of teens are getting by on less than five hours per night. Notwithstanding the effects of chronic sleep loss on teens psychological and mental well-being. Sleep loss also makes an effort to harm their physical health. Besides the fact that sleep deprivation can alter appearance with students steadily expressing the fact they “look dead.” Research shows that getting poor-quality sleep, increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. Skimping on sleep, in turn, shapes a strong link of exhaustion that can actually kill.

Sleep deprivation can noticeably affect teens however, teenage students deny that insufficient sleep has no major impact on their grade, a major concern, and responsibility for teens. Many other students also accept that while juggling academic endeavors, Senior Skylar Gelock thinks “realistically, we’re not all going to get a standard amount of sleep.” Alondra Soto, another senior at Wyoming High School, believes that “to get quality sleep means struggling to succeed in a class,” connecting to the education standards on students. “Sleeping in class isn’t the end of the world when you can just wake up and take the notes or whatever later,” Yaline says concluding that it’s just as easy to learn inside the classroom as it is outside that has no prevalent effect on your grade when dozing off in class. Still, students reason their lack of sleep thinking that if sleeping isn’t or is going to affect their grade, it justifies their sleeping habits.

Teachers, on the other hand, are frustrated corresponding to teen students lack sleep.  When they spend time on a lesson plan and students put their head down, it sends a message it sends the message  “your class is not important to me. I’d rather sleep,” Cornell, English Teacher at Wyoming High, says. Teachers signify sleeping in class as disrespectful because it’s a concern of their teaching not being effective or interesting enough impacting their learning. Cornell sees a connection between poor grades and students who are chronic sleepers that provokes more fuel to the fire.  

Consequences of the sleep deprivation range wider in severity and health effects. The constant battle for teens to get sleep is usually written off as normal. Yet, sleep deprivation reveals serious problems that propose a dire situation with the numerous health problems and overall quality of life.

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